Tag archives: choosing a healthy dog

Can I Order Now and Use the Tests in the Future?

Can I Order Now and Use the Tests in the Future?

Paw Print Genetics offers exceptional discounts and sometimes you want to take advantage of those discounts, but you don't have any dogs to test today.  Keep in mind that your order never expires and remains open until we have received your samples and completed your testing.  Order as many dogs as you want in the same order and send them at your convenience.  We do not hold samples. Rather, we will test them as we receive them, so use some now and some later. The tests will be in your account until you need them. 

Here are some tips on how to order now to take advantage of the sale and use those tests in the future.

1. You must enter a call name, breed, date of birth (month/year) and sex for each dog in an order.  All of this information can be changed when you get ready to use the samples.  Many people call them Dog1, Dog2, etc or Pup1, Pup2, etc.  You can make them all males and put the current month and year as their date of birth. Having them all males with the same birth date helps as a reminder to change this information when ...

The Importance of Testing for Adult-Onset Conditions in Your Dog

The Importance of Testing for Adult-Onset Conditions in Your Dog

An earlier article discussed congenital vs. adult onset conditions.  There seems to be some confusion as to the importance of the timing of disease symptoms.  I wanted to expand on the topic that we refer to as “age of onset”, or the age in which a condition starts to show symptoms.  Breeders may initially only be concerned with conditions that are congenital – present at birth.  While I agree that genetic screening for congenital disorders is important, screening for adult-onset conditions is also important, and should not be ignored.

Testing for congenital genetic conditions is probably a “no-brainer” for most breeders.  Genetic testing gives someone the knowledge to selectively breed dogs in order to reduce (or even eliminate) genetic diseases in the newborn pup.  As you may already know, breeding takes time and considerable resources.  Most breeders are also emotionally invested in the dogs they breed.  For many, it’s not just a hobby; it may be a full-time job or even a way of life.  Congenital diseases may cause a lot of discomfort to the affected pup, and can cause anxiety for everyone involved.  The cost of medical care may ...