Tag archives: glaucoma

Paw Print Genetics Launches Twelve New, Highly Desired Disease Tests

Paw Print Genetics Launches Twelve New, Highly Desired Disease Tests
Thank you to the many PPG customers who offered photos for this important announcement. The photos in the first two rows were selected from a large number of customers who provided photos for this article.

Paw Print Genetics is excited to announce that it has launched 12 new, very sought-after disease tests.  These tests compliment the breed-specific assays that PPG already offers, and cements our dedication to providing the largest menu of genetic tests for dogs. The following tests can be ordered as individual tests or may be part of one of our breed-specific panels that should be considered for any breeding dog.

Degenerative Myelopathy in the Bernese Mountain Dog

The Bernese Mountain Dog (BMD) has been identified as breed that can inherited degenerative myelopathy (DM). In this particular breed, two different mutations in the SOD1 gene have been identified. Degenerative myelopathy SOD1B is caused by a mutation of the SOD1 gene currently identified only in the Bernese mountain dog that is a different mutation from the common SOD1 mutation causing DM in a large number of breeds.  Bernese mountain dogs are known to develop a more slowly progressive form of degenerative myelopathy associated with the SOD1B mutation.  Both types of DM affect the white matter tissue of the spinal cord and is considered the canine equivalent to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (Lou Gehrig’s disease) found in humans. Affected dogs usually present around 8-9 ...

Preventing Inherited Ataxias and Primary Lens Luxation in the Parson Russell Terrier and Related Breeds

Preventing Inherited Ataxias and Primary Lens Luxation in the Parson Russell Terrier and Related Breeds

Previously known as the Jack Russell terrier, the Parson Russell terrier’s nearly 200 year long history began in the 1800’s when Parson John Russell of England obtained a terrier named Scout with the purpose of training him for European red fox hunting. Russell eventually developed a particularly adept line of terriers meant to run alongside hunters on horseback and dispatch foxes.

The name, Jack Russell Terrier was previously used to encompass dogs which are now recognized as three separate breeds in the U.S, the Jack Russell terrier, the Parson Russell terrier, and the Russell terrier. Despite their close genetic relationship and very similar appearance, leg length and body shape can be used to help differentiate the three breeds. Parson Russell terriers possess the longest legs and a square-shaped body while the other two breeds display shorter legs and a rectangular body shape. The Russell terrier is the shortest of the three varieties. Parson Russell terriers and Russell terriers are both recognized by the AKC, however the Jack Russell Terrier remains unrecognized by the organization and is bred primarily for its ability to hunt rather than for its conformational merits. Despite these physical differences, the three breeds share many genetic similarities ...