Archives for April 2020

National DNA Day

National DNA Day

Today, April 25th, is National DNA Day. This day commemorates the completion of the Human Genome Project in 2003 and the discovery of the DNA double helix, our blueprint of life, in 1953.  The first sequence of the Canine Genome was published only a couple of years later in 2005.  Since then, more than 3,500 species have had some of their genomes sequenced, with about 100 species having their genomes sequenced at a ‘reference quality’ meaning that they can be used to see differences among individuals and used to find genes that are responsible for certain diseases or traits.  Having the dog genome sequence has allowed researchers to identify genetic variants that make some dog breeds unique and have provided the ability to find mutations or genetic changes that are responsible for common and rare diseases.

Currently, more than 300 genetic changes in dogs are known that lead to phenotypic differences (the way a dog looks) or lead to inherited diseases.  Knowing these DNA changes or mutations allows laboratories like Paw Print Genetics to develop tests for these so that dogs can be tested to see if they are at-risk for a disease or to ...

Paw Print Genetics Launches Six New, Highly Anticipated Disease Tests

Paw Print Genetics Launches Six New, Highly Anticipated Disease Tests

Paw Print Genetics is excited to announce that it has launched six new, very desired disease tests.  These tests compliment the breed-specific assays that PPG already offers and shows our dedication to providing the largest menu of genetic tests for dogs. The following tests can be ordered as individual tests or may be found as part of one of our breed-specific panels. The breed-specific panels represent the most common and/or severe conditions in your breed and these tests should be considered for any breeding dog.

 

Acral Mutilation Syndrome

Acral Mutilation Syndrome, or AMS, is a neurologic disease affecting Cocker Spaniels, English Cocker Spaniels, English Spring Spaniels, French Spaniels, German Shorthaired Pointers, Old English Sheepdogs and the Pointer. This inherited disease can present around 4 months of age with insensitivity to pain in the lower limbs, repetitive licking and biting of the paws, which eventually can result in self-mutilation. Because affected dogs are unable to feel pain in their feet, they will continue to walk without obvious discomfort. This is an autosomal recessive condition that requires two copies of the mutation to be affected. Screening for carriers will allow breeders to avoid producing puppies with this condition.

Craniomandibular ...

New information regarding pet transmission of COVID-19

New information regarding pet transmission of COVID-19

By Robert Westra

Researchers at the Harbin Veterinary Research Institute in China have pre-released a study that indicates the virus SARS-CoV-2, responsible for the COVID-19 disease, can infect and replicate efficiently in cats.  They have also found that cats can transmit the virus to other cats via respiratory droplets.  There is still little evidence to suggest that cats can be a source of viral transmission to humans.  This study also found that dogs appear to have low susceptibility to the virus. 

Accordingly, the American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) makes these recommendations when it comes to COVID-19 and your pets.

- If you are not ill with COVID-19, you can interact with your pet as you normally would, including walking, feeding, and playing. You should continue to practice good hygiene during those interactions (e.g., wash hands before and after interacting with your pet; ensure your pet is kept well-groomed; regularly clean your pet’s food and water bowls, bedding material, and toys).

- Out of an abundance of caution, it is recommended that those ill with COVID-19 limit contact with animals until more information is known about the virus. Have another member of your household take care of walking ...